Where Hiram Knelt

hiramknelt

Last night I knelt where Hiram knelt
And took an obligation.

Today, I’m closer to my God
And I’m a Master Mason.

Though heretofore my fellow men
Seemed each one like the other;

Today, I search each one apart
I’m looking for “MY BROTHER.”

And as I feel his friendly grip
It fills my heart with pride;

I know that while I’m on the square
That he is on my side.

His footsteps on my errand go,
If I should such require;

His prayers will plead in my behalf;
If I should so desire.

My words are safe within his breast,
As though within my own;

His hand forever at my back,
To help me safely home.

Good counsel whisper in my ear,
And warns of any danger.

My square and compass, Brother now,
Who once would call me stranger.

I might have lived a normal life
And risen to distinctions;

Without my brothers helping hand,
And fellowship of Masons.

But God, who knows how hard it is
To resist life’s temptations,

Knows why I knelt where Hiram knelt;
And took an obligation

The Badge of a Freemason

Lecture summary: Called the “badge of a Freemason” in Masonic ritual, the fraternity’s apron was adapted from the protective aprons worn by working stonemasons during the 1600s and 1700s. Over the next 200 hundred years, Masonic aprons evolved in shape and style, with influence from men’s fashions and decorative preferences. This talk will highlight several examples of American aprons from the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library collection, exploring the stories of their makers and users. By looking at early aprons, we find patterns and trends in their use and design that not only differ from today, but teach us new things about Freemasonry of the past.